Magic with Macrosoft

Posted Sun, Aug. 12th 2012 in Echoes of KFest (video)

Once upon a time, only advanced programmers could achieve machine language speed. Learn how to use Macrosoft, a programming language from the same folks who brought us Nibble Magazine, to write Applesoft-like programs that achieve machine language speed, in this introduction to obtaining, using, and setting up Macrosoft and the companion Assembler. We’ll write a small Macrosoft program during the presentation to help you get started writing your own programs. See kansasfest.org/downloads/ for the associated Keynote slideshow, and read more notes from the presenter at http://bluerwhite.org/2010/08/macrosoft-kansasfest-2010/

Recorded on 7/22/2010 by Ken Gagne and made available under a ,Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0) Creative Commons license.

Turtle Robots

Posted Mon, Apr. 9th 2012 in Echoes of KFest (video)

The growth of the personal computer made computer-controlled robots popular and accessible to hobbyists. "Turtles" are a style of small, mobile robot resembling cybernetic animals. Join Peter Neubauer at KansasFest 2011 for a photo tour and comparison of several turtle robots contemporary with the Apple II.

Recorded July 22, 2011, by Ken Gagne and made available under a Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0) Creative Commons license.

LOGO: History and Programming

Posted Mon, Mar. 12th 2012 in Echoes of KFest (video)

The LOGO programming language, best known for "turtle graphics", was popular on the Apple II, especially in classrooms. LOGO is more than a child’s game. It’s a sophisticated programming language and a serious educational tool for teaching mathematics backed by decades of research on learning theory. Join Peter Neubauer at KansasFest 2011 as he discusses the history of LOGO and for a tutorial introduction to the language.

Download the Keynote or PDF of Peter’s presentation.

Recorded on July 21, 2011, by Ken Gagne and made available under a Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) Creative Commons license.

Turtle Robots

Posted Fri, Jul. 22nd 2011 in

The growth of the personal computer made computer-controlled robots popular and accessible to hobbyists. “Turtles” are a style of small, mobile robot resembling cybernetic animals. Join me for a photo tour and comparison of several turtle robots contemporary with the Apple II.

 

LOGO: History and Programming

Posted Thu, Jul. 21st 2011 in

The LOGO programming language, best known for “turtle graphics,” was popular on the Apple II, especially in classrooms. LOGO is more than a child’s game. It’s a sophisticated programming language and a serious educational tool for teaching mathematics backed by decades of research on learning theory. Join Peter Neubauer to discuss the history of LOGO and for a tutorial introduction to the language.

KansasFest 2011 countdown NDA

Posted Mon, Apr. 4th 2011 in News

Counting down the days until KansasFest 2011? Let your Apple IIGS do that for you!

KansasFest committee member, logo designer, and former HackFest winner Peter Neubauer has created a GS/OS New Desk Accessory (NDA) that dynamically updates the days, hours, minutes, and seconds left until the 22nd annual Apple II convention opens for a week of sessions, competitions, friends, and surprises. Now you’ll never be wanting for a precise knowledge of how long before your anticipation is rewarded.

KansasFest 2011 countdown NDA

Can't wait for KansasFest? Neither can your Apple II!

Get your KansasFest 2011 Countdown NDA (with source code!) as either a SHK archive or PO disk image — perfect for your real or emulated Apple II.

Magic with Macrosoft

Posted Thu, Jul. 22nd 2010 in

Machine Language Speed for Applesoft Programmers – Peter Neubauer

“Once upon a time, only advanced programmers could achieve machine language speed.” Learn how to use Macrosoft, a programming language from the same folks who brought us Nibble Magazine, to write Applesoft-like programs that achieve machine language speed, in this introduction to obtaining, using, and setting up Macrosoft and the companion Assembler. We’ll write a small Macrosoft program dur ing the presentation to help you get started writing your own programs.

[Reference: http://www.nibblemagazine.net/assmblr_macrosoft.htm]